WHAT IS GLYCOGEN?

Glycogen is one of the main energy stores in your body. Energy from carbohydrates, such as glucose, that is not for immediate use, gets stored as glycogen. When the body needs more energy, glucose can be released from the glycogen stores.

WHERE IS GLYCOGEN STORED

Glycogen is stored in multiple locations, most notably in the liver and the muscles.

IS THERE A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE DIFFERENT GLYCOGEN STORES?

Yes. The liver’s glycogen stores are used to control the levels of glucose in the blood. In this way, the liver’s glycogen stores influence energy levels throughout the body. Muscle glycogen stores are used to provide energy for the muscles.

WHAT IS A LIVER GSD?

A liver GSD is a glycogen storage disease primarily related to the glycogen stores in the liver.

WHAT IS A MUSCLE GSD?

 A muscle GSD is a glycogen storage disease primarily related to the glycogen stores in the muscles. Muscle GSDs are not covered by this website.

WHY DOES THIS WEBSITE ONLY COVER LIVER GSDS?

This website only covers liver GSDs (GSDs related to the liver’s glycogen stores) because the different liver GSDs have a lot in common, in terms of symptoms experienced and how they are managed. Individuals with muscle GSDs require very different management.

HOW DOES GLUCOSE GET STORED AS GLYCOGEN?

When you eat a meal that is rich in carbohydrates, the level of glucose in the blood starts to rise. A hormone called insulin will then be released. Insulin removes excess glucose from the blood. This excess glucose is placed in the glycogen stores.

HOW IS GLUCOSE RELEASED FROM THE GLYCOGEN STORES?

When blood glucose levels start to go low, the body releases another hormone called glucagon. Glucagon causes the release of glucose from the glycogen stores. This process does not work in GSD.